Fish #388

September 23, 2016

Image from shankar s

This week on Science for the People we have a trio of fishy experts helping us look at how fish are adapted to their — sometimes extreme — environments, and what their behaviour can tell us about their intelligence and experience. We speak to Kristin O'Brien, a zoologist at the University of Alaska, about how fish manage to survive the extreme cold of Arctic waters. We talk with Heidi Golden, a postdoctoral researcher from the University of Connecticut, about the Arctic grayling. And we speak with Jonathan Balcombe, director of animal sentience at the Humane Society Institute for Science and Policy, about his new book "What a Fish Knows: The Inner Lives of our Underwater Cousins".

This episode is partially hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.

Guests:

  • Kristin O'Brien
  • Heidi Golden
  • Jonathan Balcombe

Guest Bios

Kristin O'Brien

Kristin O'Brien is a zoologist at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. She studies how cold-blooded fish can maintain energy production in the extremely cold temperatures of the Antarctic ocean.

Heidi Golden

Heidi Golden is a postdoctoral researcher in aquatic ecology at the University of Connecticut in Storrs. She studies grayling and how these fish survive and thrive in the Arctic.

Jonathan Balcombe

Jonathan Balcombe is the director of animal sentience at the Humane Society Institute for Science and Policy and the author of five books, including "Second Nature", "Pleasurable Kingdom", and the newly released "What a Fish Knows: The Inner Lives of our Underwater Cousins". He has appeared on Fresh Air with Terry Gross, The Diane Rehm Show, the BBC, and the National Geographic Channel, and in several documentaries, and he has contributed features and opinions to The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, and Nature, among other publications.

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