About The Show

Science for the People is a syndicated radio show and podcast that broadcasts weekly across North America. We are a long-format interview show that explores the connections between science, popular culture, history, and public policy, to help listeners understand the evidence and arguments behind what's in the news and on the shelves.

Every week, our hosts sit down with science researchers, writers, authors, journalists, and experts to discuss science from the past, the science that affects our lives today, and how science might change our future.

Contact

If you have comments, show ideas, or questions about Science for the People, email feedback@scienceforthepeople.ca.

Theme Song

Our theme song music comes from the song "Binary Consequence" by the band Fractal Pattern. You can find the full version of it on their album No Hope But Mt. Hope.

License & Copyright

All Science for the People episodes are under the Creative Commons license. You are free to distribute unedited versions of the episodes for non-commercial purposes. If you would like to edit the episode please contact us.

The Team

Desiree Schell

Host

I'm constantly fascinated by how the world works, and I can’t remember the last time I was bored. I'm not a scientist or academic of any variety, I simply believe in using curiosity and critical analysis to guide my life. I use Philip K. Dick’s words as a litmus test: "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".

desiree@scienceforthepeople.ca @desireeschell

Rachelle Saunders

Producer & Host

I have a college diploma in theatre production I've arguably never made proper use of, and am a self-taught web developer, which is the skill set I use pretty much every day. I find logic fascinating, love a good argument, and am always trying to figure out why things are they way they are, or why people think the way they do.

rachelle@scienceforthepeople.ca @afterthree

K.O. Myers

Editor & Online Content Director

I have a habit of wanting to know how things work, and I tend to not be satisfied with “because it does". Science at its best is a tool for bringing the contours of the universe into better focus, and I find that idea enormously appealing.

ko@scienceforthepeople.ca @KO_Myers

Ryan Bromsgrove

Editor

I went to the University of Alberta and stumbled upon a BSc. in Physics for a reason I no longer remember. Nowadays, I can be found committing freelance journalism, knowing far too much about Canadian university newspapers, and probably never entering the real world. My interests vary from science to philosophy, writing, video games and programming, ensuring that I’ll never be an expert in any. I'm also not fond of loud motorcyclists.

ryan@scienceforthepeople.ca @ryawesome

Helen Quevillon

Publishing Liaison

Ever since I was young, I have been curious about the world around me. I was always asking why in an effort to learn how and why things worked. This innate curiosity is what lead me to study science and my nerdiness in general. As a biological science student I get to spend most of my days asking "why?" I can’t think of anything better.

helen@scienceforthepeople.ca

Josh Witten

Research

I’m convinced that the scientific view of the world is the most fun way to view the world and I'm working hard-ish to convince everyone else I’m right.

josh@scienceforthepeople.ca @joshwitten

Marie-Claire Shanahan

Guest Host

I love science and I’ve been hooked on finding ways to explain and share that love since my chemistry teacher handed me the chalk and challenged me to teach the class one day (probably because I was asking him too many questions). As a teacher and science education researcher I like nothing more than helping people make logical sense of the world around us.

marie-claire@scienceforthepeople.ca @mcshanahan

Forrest Caissie

Studio Technician

I'm interested in the connections between science, politics, and culture, and one day I hope to pass that interest along to the next generation by becoming a teacher.